Nebula Award Winners 2011

Posted Sunday May 20, 2012 by John Gunders in |

The Nebula Award winners for 2011 were announced overnight:

Novel: Among Others, by Jo Walton (Tor)

Novella: “The Man Who Bridged the Mist,” Kij Johnson (Asimov’s Science Fiction, October/November 2011)

Novellette: “What We Found,” Geoff Ryman (The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, September/October 2011)

Short Story: “The Paper Menagerie,” Ken Liu (The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, March/April 2011)

Ray Bradbury Award for Outstanding Dramatic Presentation: Doctor Who: “The Doctor’s Wife,” Neil Gaiman (writer), Richard Clark (director) (BBC Wales)

Andre Norton Award for Young Adult Science Fiction and Fantasy Book: The Freedom Maze, Delia Sherman (Big Mouth House)

Hugo Award Nominees 2012

Posted Saturday April 7, 2012 by John Gunders in |

Nominations for the 2012 Hugo Awards were announced overnight. You can find the full list here. Nominations for best novel are:

Among Others, Jo Walton (Tor)
A Dance With Dragons, George R. R. Martin (Bantam Spectra)
Deadline, Mira Grant (Orbit)
Embassytown, China Miéville (Macmillan / Del Rey)
Leviathan Wakes, James S. A. Corey (Orbit)

Jo Walton and China Miéville have the chance to make it a Hugo/Nebula double.

In other interesting news, the five nominations for “Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form” include three episodes of Doctor Who (“The Doctor’s Wife”, “The Girl Who Waited”, and “A Good Man Goes to War”), and an episode of Community (“Remedial Chaos Theory”). I must say, I never expected to see an episode of Community on a Hugos list, but the nominated ep is a masterpiece of alternative reality fiction. I wouldn’t be surprised if it picked up the gong: Doctor Who has owned the category for half a decade, and this must grate a little on US voters, but as much as I loved “The Doctor’s Wife” (screenwriter: Neil Gaiman), “Remedial Chaos Theory” was almost flawless television.

Winners will be announced at the World Science Fiction Convention in Chicago, 30 August – 3 September.

Nebula Award Nominees 2011

Posted Monday February 20, 2012 by John Gunders in |

Overnight the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America announced the nominees for the 2011 Nebula awards. It was also announced that the recipient of the 2011 Damon Knight Grand Master Award for lifetime contributions and achievements in the field will be awarded to two-time winner (1992, 2010) Connie Willis, who has also received Hugo awards for best novel in 1992, 1999, and 2010.

Kameron Hurley and Genevieve Valentine are the only first-time nominees for best novel. Jack McDevitt won in 2007 with Seeker.

The winners will be announced in May.

Novel
Among Others, Jo Walton (Tor)
Embassytown, China Miéville (Macmillan UK; Del Rey; Subterranean Press)
Firebird, Jack McDevitt (Ace Books)
God’s War, Kameron Hurley (Night Shade Books)
Mechanique: A Tale of the Circus Tresaulti, Genevieve Valentine (Prime Books)
The Kingdom of Gods, N.K. Jemisin (Orbit US; Orbit UK)

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Nebula Award Winners 2011

Posted Sunday May 22, 2011 by John Gunders in |

The Nebula Awards for 2011 (books and stories published in 2010) were announced over the weekend:

Winning Novel: Blackout/All Clear by Connie Willis (Spectra)
Winning Novella: “The Lady Who Plucked Red Flowers Beneath the Queen’s Window” by Rachel Swirsky (Subterranean Summer ’10)
Winning Novelette: “That Leviathan Whom Thou Hast Made” by Eric James Stone (Analog 9/10)
Winning Short Story (tie): “Ponies” by Kij Johnson (Tor.com 1/17/10) and “How Interesting: A Tiny Man” by Harlan Ellison (Realms of Fantasy 2/10)
Ray Bradbury Award: Inception
Andre Norton Award: I Shall Wear Midnight by Terry Pratchett (Gollancz; Harper)

The full list of nominees are here.

Hugo Award Nominations 2011

Posted Sunday April 24, 2011 by John Gunders in |

Busy times at House Memes, so instead of a substantive post, here are the nominations for the 2011 Hugo Awards. Winners will be announced at Renovation, the 69th World Science Fiction Convention in August.

Best Novel
Blackout/All Clear by Connie Willis (Ballantine Spectra)
Cryoburn by Lois McMaster Bujold (Baen)
The Dervish House by Ian McDonald (Gollancz; Pyr)
Feed by Mira Grant (Orbit)
The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin (Orbit)

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Nebula Award Nominees 2010

Posted Tuesday February 22, 2011 by John Gunders in |

The Nebula Awards for science fiction and fantasy published in 2010 were announced yesterday.

Unlike the Hugo Awards, which are popular awards voted on by registrants at Worldcon, the Nebulas are peers awards, and nominations and votes are limited to active members of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. The winners will be announced on 21 May 2011.

There are six categories: Short Story, Novelette, Novella, Novel, The Ray Bradbury Award for Outstanding Dramatic Presentation, and the Andre Norton Award for Young Adult Science Fiction and Fantasy. At the ceremony in May they will also announce the winner of the Solstice Award for outstanding contribution to the field.

Read on for a full list of the nominees…

Hugo Award Winners 2010

Posted Monday September 6, 2010 by John Gunders in |

The Hugo Awards were announced last night at Aussiecon 4 in Melbourne. This year a tie for best novel, which means I have to buy two new books for my growing collection of Hugo and Nebula winners.

Also, Russell T Davies bows out of Doctor Who with a win for “Waters of Mars.”

Best Novel: TIE: The City & The City, China Miéville (Del Rey; Macmillan UK); The Windup Girl, Paolo Bacigalupi (Night Shade)
Best Novella: “Palimpsest”, Charles Stross (Wireless; Ace, Orbit)
Best Novelette: “The Island”, Peter Watts (The New Space Opera 2; Eos)
Best Short Story: “Bridesicle”, Will McIntosh (Asimov’s 1/09)
Best Related Book: This is Me, Jack Vance! (Or, More Properly, This is “I”), Jack Vance (Subterranean)
Best Graphic Story: Girl Genius, Volume 9: Agatha Heterodyne and the Heirs of the Storm Written by Kaja and Phil Foglio; Art by Phil Foglio; Colours by Cheyenne Wright (Airship Entertainment)
Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form: Moon Screenplay by Nathan Parker; Story by Duncan Jones; Directed by Duncan Jones (Liberty Films)
Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form: Doctor Who: “The Waters of Mars” Written by Russell T Davies & Phil Ford; Directed by Graeme Harper (BBC Wales)
Best Editor Long Form: Patrick Nielsen Hayden
Best Editor Short Form: Ellen Datlow
Best Professional Artist: Shaun Tan
Best Semiprozine: Clarkesworld edited by Neil Clarke, Sean Wallace, & Cheryl Morgan
Best Fan Writer: Frederik Pohl
Best Fanzine: StarShipSofa edited by Tony C. Smith
Best Fan Artist: Brad W. Foster
John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer (presented by Dell Magazines): Seanan McGuire

Nebula Awards 2010

Posted Sunday May 16, 2010 by John Gunders in |

The 2010 Nebula Awards for science fiction and fantasy published in 2009 were announced at a ceremony in Florida yesterday.

Unlike the Hugo Awards, which are popular awards voted on by registrants at Worldcon, the Nebulas are peers awards, and nominations and votes are limited to active members of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America.

Novel
The Windup Girl – Paolo Bacigalupi (Night Shade Books, Sept. 2009)

Novella
The Women of Nell Gwynne’s – Kage Baker (Subterranean Press, June 2009)

Novelette
“Sinner, Baker, Fabulist, Priest; Red Mask, Black Mask, Gentleman, Beast,”
Eugie Foster (Interzone, Feb. 2009)

Short Story
“Spar,” Kij Johnson (Clarkesworld, Oct. 2009)

Ray Bradbury Award
District 9, Neill Blomkamp and Terri Tatchell (Tri-Star, Aug. 2009)

Andre Norton Award (for Young Adult Science Fiction and Fantasy)
The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making,
Catherynne M. Valente (Catherynne M. Valente, June 2009)

Additional Honors
During the ceremonies, Joe Haldeman was honored as the next Damon Knight Grand Master, while Neal Barrett, Jr., was honored as Author Emeritus. Vonda N. McIntyre and Keith Stokes were honored with SFWA Service Awards while the SFWA Solstice Award, bestowed upon individuals who have made a significant impact on the science fiction or fantasy landscape, was presented to Tom Doherty, Terri Windling and the late Donald A. Wollheim.

Hugo Nominees 2010

Posted Monday April 5, 2010 by John Gunders in |

The epic that is the nominations for the 2010 Hugo Awards has been announced. Sixteen categories ranging from Best Novel to Best Editor, and including two drama categories (long form and short form) and the John W Campbell Award for the Best New Writer.

Winners will be announced at AussieCon 4 in September. Results, as always, will be here.

Best Novel
Boneshaker, Cherie Priest (Tor)
The City & The City, China Miéville (Del Rey; Macmillan UK)
Julian Comstock: A Story of 22nd-Century America, Robert Charles Wilson (Tor)
Palimpsest, Catherynne M. Valente (Bantam Spectra)
Wake, Robert J. Sawyer (Ace; Penguin; Gollancz; Analog)
The Windup Girl, Paolo Bacigalupi (Night Shade)

Best Novella
“Act One”, Nancy Kress (Asimov’s 3/09)
The God Engines, John Scalzi (Subterranean)
“Palimpsest”, Charles Stross (Wireless)
Shambling Towards Hiroshima, James Morrow (Tachyon)
“Vishnu at the Cat Circus”, Ian McDonald (Cyberabad Days)
The Women of Nell Gwynne’s, Kage Baker (Subterranean)

Best Novelette
“Eros, Philia, Agape”, Rachel Swirsky (Tor.com 3/09)
The Island”, Peter Watts (The New Space Opera 2)
“It Takes Two”, Nicola Griffith (Eclipse Three)
“One of Our Bastards is Missing”, Paul Cornell (The Solaris Book of New Science Fiction: Volume Three)
“Overtime”, Charles Stross (Tor.com 12/09)
“Sinner, Baker, Fabulist, Priest; Red Mask, Black Mask, Gentleman, Beast”, Eugie Foster (Interzone 2/09)

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Ada Lovelace Day 2010: Alice Sheldon

Posted Thursday March 25, 2010 by John Gunders in |

Oops, nearly missed Ada Lovelace Day, but it’s still the 24th in some parts of the world, so I guess I’m OK.

Like last year’s post, I’m interpreting the rules of the event rather liberally. My subject was not a scientist nor a technologist, although she did hold a PhD in experimental psychology. And for much of her public career, many people didn’t even realise she was a woman.

Alice Sheldon is, of course, better known as science fiction novelist and short story writer, James Tiptree Jr.

Sheldon was a graphic artist and journalist before joining the US army in 1942 where she worked in photo intelligence, and after the war worked with the CIA for three years, apparently working under cover in the Near East for a time.

In 1956 Sheldon enrolled in a BA at American University, worked for a time as a graduate tutor before graduating with a PhD from George Washington University in 1967. After that she started writing science fiction under the pseudonym James Tiptree Jr. She claimed that she took the name deliberately to hide her gender:

“A male name seemed like good camouflage. I had the feeling that a man would slip by less observed. I’ve had too many experiences in my life of being the first woman in some damned occupation.” (Profile, Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, April 1983, via Wikipedia)

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